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Future Plans

 
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    Will' andwon't' to describe plans/intentions

    There are a number of ways to describe the future in English. The most commonly used form is will'. Will is used to when we are predicting what our future plans are when we are not really sure. The sentences below describe plans that can be changed quite easily.

     

    Subject + will/won't + bare infinitive + object:

     

    • I think I will go to the party

    • I'm sure I will see you there

    • I think I won't go I'm too tired 

     

     

    Usingdefinitely' andprobably'  

    To make the sentences stronger in terms of certainty, we can add definitely' and probably'. Definitely is the stronger of the two. Note the change in word order in the negative sentences.

     

    Subject + will + definitely/probably + bare infinitive + object:

     

    • I'll definitely see you later (very, very certain)

    • I'll probably see you later (very certain)

     

    Subject + will + definitely/probably + bare infinitive + object:

     

    • I definitely won't go on a date with you! (no chance)

    • I probably won't go for a drink with you (less chance)

     

     

    Using "might" to describe future plans/intentions

    Stronger in terms of certainty, than might' or will' is going to'. We use going to' when we have decided on a plan for the future recently or we have thought about these plans for some time. With going to' the plans could still change because of an unexpected problem, for example.
     

    Subject + ‘to be' + going to + verb + object
     

    • I am going to go to the theatre on Friday

    • He's going to buy the tickets

    • She is going to see a doctor about her bad back

    • They are going to ask the boss for more money tonight

    • She isn't going to say anything

    • He isn't going to drink beer this week

     

     

    Present continuous for future plans/intentions

    When using the present continuous for future plans, it is important to think about the difference between a plan and an arrangement. In the future, plans change but an arrangement is difficult to change because an arrangement has people, tickets, times and places included so the people involved with an arrangement does not want to cancel at all.
     

    Subject + ‘to be' + verb-ing + object
     

    • I'm meeting my mother in the city centre at 7.30 (can you cancel a meeting with your mother?)

    • We are watching the band tomorrow at the stadium (you have bought the tickets)

    • She's seeing him again tomorrow (she's not going to cancel)

     

     

    Present simple for future events

    If we talk about future events that include timetables or schedules like train times, office hours or lesson starts, for example, the present simple is used.
      

    • The plane arrives at 5:00

    • The lesson always starts at 19:30

     

     

    Question forms for future plans/intentions

    Remember, when answering questions about future plans use the structure that best describes the certainty of your actions. It is often easier to use will' but using the other forms adds a lot of quality and detail to your English
      

    • Are you going to clean the fridge?

    • What are going to do tomorrow?

    • Will you turn the music off?

    • When will you send me an e-mail?

    • Are you doing anything special this Christmas?

    • Who are you meeting in the park later?

    • Does the train leave at 3 or 4?

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