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Common mistakes

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Someone has stolen all her money.
Someone has robbed all her money.
Some men robbed a bank last night.
Some men stole a bank last night.

The object of steal is the thing taken by the thief, such as money, a watch, a bicycle, etc., while the object of rob is the person or place from whom (or which) the thing is taken, such as a man, a house, or a bank.

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Look at this dog across the street!
Look at that dog across the street!

This is used to indicate something physically close to the speaker. In the case of abstract things we use this for things which are most immediately present. This is a lovely song! I'll help you do it this time. When we talk about more than one thing we use this for the closer or more immediate and that for the further away or more remote in time. If we're only talking about one thing we usually use that: What's that noise? That's a nice coat! Don't do that!

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Is it true that Diana's very ill?
Is it truth that Diana's very ill?

Truth isn't an adjective but a noun. The adjective is true, and we use it with no article between it and the verb to be.

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I was hearing her CDs.
I was listening to her CDs.

To listen to may also means to think carefully about what someone say: Gerry always listens to his mother.

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Anne said to me, 'You're fool.'
Anne said to me, 'You're a fool.'
Anne said to me, 'You're a foolish.'
Anne said to me, 'You're foolish.'

Fool is a noun, and requires the article when we use it with the verb to be. Foolish is an adjective, and can't be used with the article after the verb to be.

A fool or a foolish person doesn't mean an insane person, but one who acts thoughtlessly. We tend to use silly or stupid instead of foolish in modern usage.

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