Aprende el inglés auténtico de libros y películas.

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5

Errores frecuentes

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I bought a book at fifty pence.
I bought a book for fifty pence.
I can't buy it for such a high price.
I can't buy it at such a high price.

Use for if the actual sum is mentioned, use at if the actual sum isn't given.

If the weight or measure follows the price, use at with the actual sum: That velvet is available at £5 a metre.

Next
We walked to the river and back.
We walked till the river and back.
I'll stay here till next month.
I'll stay here to next month.

Use to with distance, and till (until) with time.

Next
She's lived here since two years.
She's lived here for two years.

Place the preposition for before words or phrases denoting a period of time: for three days, for six weeks, for two years, for a few minutes, for a long time. Use it with any tense except the present.

For is often omitted. We can say: I've been here for two years or I've been here two years.

Next
He's the tallest of all the boys.
He's the tallest from all the boys.
Also possible:
He's the tallest boy in the class.

Precede adjectives (or adverbs) in the superlative degree by the and follow them by of or in.

Next
Ian's been ill since last Friday.
Ian's been ill from last Friday.

Place the preposition since before words or phrases denoting a point in time: since Monday, since yesterday, since eight o'clock, since Christmas. When we use since, the verb is usually in the present perfect tense, but it may be in the past perfect: I was glad to see Tom. I hadn't seen him since last Christmas.

From can also denote a point in time, but it must be followed by to or till: He works from eight o'clock till one o'clock without a break.

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Tema superado!
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