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Common mistakes

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She's lived here for two years.
She's lived here since two years.

Place the preposition for before words or phrases denoting a period of time: for three days, for six weeks, for two years, for a few minutes, for a long time. Use it with any tense except the present.

For is often omitted. We can say: I've been here for two years or I've been here two years.

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Gemma spent all the day in her room.
Gemma spent all the day into her room.
Richard came into the room and sat down.
Richard came in the room and sat down.

In denotes position inside something, while into denotes motion or direction towards the inside of something.

Always write the preposition into as one word.

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Liam has a flat at Paris.
Liam has a flat in Paris.
My mother is staying in 66 Argyle Street.
My mother is staying at 66 Argyle Street.

We use in to describe the physical location of something as part of a larger thing or place. We use at when we're talking about an address, a public place or building (a bus stop, the Post Office, the library etc.) and cases in which the location is irrelevant but what we do there is what matters (school, the dentist, dance class etc.) 

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There was a fight among two boys.
There was a fight between two boys.
Divide the apple between you three.
Divide the apple among you three.

Use between for two only. Use among for more than two.

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I bought a book for fifty pence.
I bought a book at fifty pence.
I can't buy it at such a high price.
I can't buy it for such a high price.

Use for if the actual sum is mentioned, use at if the actual sum isn't given.

If the weight or measure follows the price, use at with the actual sum: That velvet is available at £5 a metre.

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