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Common mistakes

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Ian's been ill from last Friday.
Ian's been ill since last Friday.

Place the preposition since before words or phrases denoting a point in time: since Monday, since yesterday, since eight o'clock, since Christmas. When we use since, the verb is usually in the present perfect tense, but it may be in the past perfect: I was glad to see Tom. I hadn't seen him since last Christmas.

From can also denote a point in time, but it must be followed by to or till: He works from eight o'clock till one o'clock without a break.

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Charlie was standing just besides me.
Charlie was standing just beside me.
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The teacher spoke for bad habits,
The teacher spoke about bad habits.

Don't use for in the sense of about. The chief use of for is to convey the idea of being in favour of. If we say that the teacher spoke for bad habits it's like saying that he/she spoke in favour of bad habits!

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I have other books except these.
I have other books besides these
Also possible:
I have other books as well as these

Except means to leave out: Everyone was present except John.

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She's lived here for two years.
She's lived here since two years.

Place the preposition for before words or phrases denoting a period of time: for three days, for six weeks, for two years, for a few minutes, for a long time. Use it with any tense except the present.

For is often omitted. We can say: I've been here for two years or I've been here two years.

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