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I past by your house yesterday.
I passed by your house yesterday.

Past isn't a verb. The past tense and past participle of the verb to pass is passed.

We can use past as a noun: Don't think of the past; an adjective: The past week was warm; a preposition: We walked past the church; an adverb: The train went past.

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You don't look as your mother.
You don't look like your mother.

As is a conjunction, and is usually followed by a noun or pronoun in the nominative case. Like isn't a conjunction, but an adjective which behaves like a preposition being followed by a noun or pronoun in the objective case.

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Anne said to me, 'You're fool.'
Anne said to me, 'You're a fool.'
Anne said to me, 'You're a foolish.'
Anne said to me, 'You're foolish.'

Fool is a noun, and requires the article when we use it with the verb to be. Foolish is an adjective, and can't be used with the article after the verb to be.

A fool or a foolish person doesn't mean an insane person, but one who acts thoughtlessly. We tend to use silly or stupid instead of foolish in modern usage.

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I spent the rest day at home
I spent the rest of the day at home.

Here, rest is a noun, and we can't use it as an adjective in the meaning of what's left.

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The little girl sang beautifully.
The little girl sang beautiful.

We use an adverb, and not an adjective, to qualify a verb.

After verbs such as look, feel, sound, taste, smell use an adjective instead of an adverb: Sugar tastes sweet (not sweetly).

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Promosso!
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