Impara il vero inglese da film e libri.

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I don't sympathise him very much.
I don't like him very much.

Sympathise isn't synonymous with like. To sympathise with means to share some feeling (usually of sorrow) with another person: I sympathise with you in your sorrow.

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The carpenter made a large table.
The carpenter did a large table.
You must do your work carefully.
You must make your work carefully.

To make primarily means to construct or manufacture something, while to do means to accomplish a thing.

Common exceptions with make and do.

(a) To make a mistake, to make a promise, to make a speech, to make an excuse, to make haste, to make fun of, to make progress, to make a noise, to make a bed (= to prepare the bed for sleeping on)

(b) To do good, to do evil, to do your best, to do your duty, to do someone a favour, to do wrong, to do a puzzle, to do business, to do away with, to do gymnastics, to do exercises.

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I'll go to bed early tonight.
I'll sleep early tonight.

To go to bed denotes the act of lying down on a bed in preparation for going to sleep. We can say that a person went to bed at nine o'clock, but that he didn't sleep until eleven o'clock. Then he slept soundly. Go to sleep means to fall asleep. He went to sleep while he was in the cinema.

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Oliver takes care of his brother's investments.
Oliver cares about his brother's investments.

Care about means to like and be concerned about something or someone. Take care of means to look after someone or something: You should take care of your children, or do something to remedy a problem: I think I should take care of that broken pane of glass. Care for means to look after: I cared
for you when you were ill. Care for can also mean to be fond of someone or something: William really cares for geraniums, though this use is rather old-fashioned.

Avoid also such expressions as: (1) He doesn't care for my advice, (2) He doesn't care for his work, (3) He took no care of him, (4) No one cared for him during his illness. Say : (1) He pays no attention to my advice, (2) He takes no care over his work, (3) He took no notice of him, (4) No one took care of him during his illness.

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Do you want to see my collection?
Do you like to see my collection?

Do you like to do something? means do you enjoy doing it as a habitual action. Do you want to do something? means do you wish to do it now.

I would/'d like means I want: I would/'d like (= I want) to play tennis today. Would you like (= do you want) to go for a walk with me? Would/'d like is more polite than want.

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Promosso!
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