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5

Erros comuns

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Use further to mean both greater distance and more of something. We only use farther for distances: I live a bit farther away than you. Don't use it to mean more. We use further for both meanings in modern English.

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Jack was wounded in a car accident.
Jack was injured in a car accident.

People are injured or hurt as a result of an accident or a fight, but people are wounded in wars and battles.

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Look at that dog across the street!
Look at this dog across the street!

This is used to indicate something physically close to the speaker. In the case of abstract things we use this for things which are most immediately present. This is a lovely song! I'll help you do it this time. When we talk about more than one thing we use this for the closer or more immediate and that for the further away or more remote in time. If we're only talking about one thing we usually use that: What's that noise? That's a nice coat! Don't do that!

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Louis has got any milk.
Louis has got some milk.
There aren't some books on the shelf.
There aren't any books on the shelf.

We usually use some for affirmative phrases: She's got some chicken, and any in negative and interrogative phrases: Ian hasn't bought any food today. Have you bought any food? We sometimes use some in questions: Would you like some soup?

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My elder brother is six feet tall.
My elder brother is six feet high.

We generally use tall with people, and it's the opposite of short. Use high when referring to trees, buildings, or mountains, and it's the opposite of low.

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