Learn real English from movies and books.

Add words or phrases for learning and practice with other learners.

5

Common mistakes

Choose the correct option
She gave an apple to every of the children.
She gave an apple to each of the children.
Each child had an apple.
Every child had an apple.

Use each for one of two or more things, taken one by one. Never use every for two, but always for more than two things, taken as a group. Each is more individual and specific, but every is the more emphatic word.

Each and every are always singular: Each (or every) one of the twenty boys has a book.

Next
I'm two years smaller than you
I'm two years younger than you.
She's three years bigger than me.
She's three years older than me.

If reference is to age, say young or old. Small and big usually refer to size: He is big (or small) for his age.

Great refers to the importance of a person or thing: Napoleon was a great man, Homer's Iliad is a great book. Use great with words like distance, height, length, depth: There is a great distance between the earth and the moon. Informally, use great to mean something nice or good: We watched a great concert last night.

Next
I've read an interested story.
I've read an interesting story
Are you interesting in your work?
Are you interested in your work?

Interesting refers to the thing which arouses interest, while interested refers to the person who takes an interest in the thing.

Next
I was angry to hear of her death.
I was sorry to hear of her death.

Sorry is the opposite of glad. Angry means annoyed or enraged: He was angry when a boy hit him in the face.

Next
My elder brother is six feet tall.
My elder brother is six feet high.

We generally use tall with people, and it's the opposite of short. Use high when referring to trees, buildings, or mountains, and it's the opposite of low.

Next
Topic passed!
]