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John visits his aunt every Sunday,
John visits her aunt every Sunday

In English, possessive adjectives (and pronouns) agree with the person who possesses, and not with the person or thing possessed. When the possessor is masculine, use his, and when the possessor is feminine, use her.

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He took little exercise and wasn't very fit.
He took a little exercise and wasn't very fit.
She took a little exercise and felt much better.
She took little exercise and felt much better.

Little means not much and emphasises the smallness of the amount. It's distinguished from a little which means at least some.

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Our teacher is very nervous today.
Our teacher is very angry today.

Nervous means to be easily frightened or upset and can be a temporary or permanent condition. Angry describes someone's mood at a given moment.

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They have less books than I have.
They have fewer books than I have.

Less denotes amount, quantity, value, or degree, fewer denotes number. We may have less water, less food, less money, less education, but fewer books, fewer letters, fewer friends.

We say less than (five, six, etc.) pounds because the pounds are considered as a sum of money and not as a number of coins.

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Turn the page for farther instructions.
Turn the page for further instructions

Use further to mean both greater distance and more of something. We only use farther for distances: I live a bit farther away than you. Don't use it to mean more. We use further for both meanings in modern English.

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