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Common mistakes

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Every morning I'm going for a walk.
Every morning I go for a walk.

Use the simple present (and not the present continuous) to express a present habitual action.

Use the present continuous to express a habitual action with the word always or with a verb denoting a continuous state: He is always talking in class; He is living in London.

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Rachel asked me what I was doing.
Rachel asked me what I am doing.

When the verb in the main clause is in the past tense, use a past tense in subordinate clauses.

This rule doesn't apply (1) to verbs within quotations, (2) to facts that are true at all times. We say:
1. She said, 'I am waiting for your answer'
2. He said that London is a great city

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Ben thought he could win the prize.
Ben thought he can win the prize.

Can changes to could in subordinate clauses, when the verb in the main clause is in the past simple tense.

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I have seen the Parthenon of Athens.
I saw the Parthenon of Athens.

If we are speaking of the result of a past action rather than of the action we must use the present perfect tense. When somebody says, I have seen Panthenon, he or she is not thinking so much of the past act of seeing it, as the present result of that past action.

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Since he came, we're happy.
Since he came, we've been happy

The verb after a since clause of time is generally in the present perfect tense.

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