Ucz się prawdziwego angielskiego z książek i filmów.

Dodawaj słowa i zwroty, by uczyć się ich i ćwiczyć z innymi uczniami.


Często popełniane błędy

Wybierz poprawną opcję
I love you! Will you marry me?
I like you! Will you marry me?

Both verbs can be used for people and things, the only difference is one of degree. Love is much stronger than like.

The examiner let me sit quietly until everyone had finished.
The examiner made me sit quietly until everyone had finished.

Don't use let in the sense of make, meaning to force.

The teacher agreed to go with us.
The teacher accepted to go with us.

Accept means to take something that is offered to you. Maria accepted the bunch of flowers. It also means to believe something you're told: Ken accepted his explanation. Agree to means to do what one is asked to do: David agreed to come to London on Monday, but agree with means to have the same opinion as someone else. The Long family never agree with each other.

We agree with a person, but to a thing. I agree with Luke, but I can't agree to this plan.

The carpenter did a large table.
The carpenter made a large table.
You must make your work carefully.
You must do your work carefully.

To make primarily means to construct or manufacture something, while to do means to accomplish a thing.

Common exceptions with make and do.

(a) To make a mistake, to make a promise, to make a speech, to make an excuse, to make haste, to make fun of, to make progress, to make a noise, to make a bed (= to prepare the bed for sleeping on)

(b) To do good, to do evil, to do your best, to do your duty, to do someone a favour, to do wrong, to do a puzzle, to do business, to do away with, to do gymnastics, to do exercises.

We seat at a desk to write a letter.
We sit at a desk to write a letter.
He sat the passengers one by one.
He seated the passengers one by one.

Use sit as an intransitive verb. Seat is a transitive verb and requires an object. Very often the object of seat is a reflexive pronoun: He seated himself near the fire. The principal parts of the two verbs are: sit, sat, sat, and seat, seated, seated.

Don't confuse sit with set, which usually means to place. Common idioms with set: to set the table, to set on fire, to set off (or out), to set a trap, to set a clock, to set a price, to set your heart on, to set free, to set an example, to set a broken bone, to set to work (= to start work).

Zdany temat!

Sory, but this user can't accept your call now.

Sorry, but you can't call to this user.